Achives: tefl teacher advice

By Katie Baxter
Guest blogger from onlinetefl.com

Can I still teach English abroad if I don’t know the local language?

By Viault (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

The simple answer is yes. You really don’t need to have a full grasp of the local lingo to be an English teacher overseas. In fact because schools expect students to be fully immersed in the English language, it’s frowned upon for English teachers to speak the local language when they’re in the classroom. And because you’ll probably be working in a language school or institute, there will be lots of people around who speak English.

However, you’ll have a life outside of the school gates and it’s such a great feeling to be able to order a meal or book a train journey in the local language. It shows you’ve made and an effort and it’ll also make your time overseas a lot easier and a lot more rewarding.

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by Elliot Lord
Author of TEFLing Without Resources (except this one!)

Sometimes, when you open the course book to see what you need to go through next, you get disheartened by the presentations or exercises on the page. Despite using good quality books most of the time, I would still come across this situation many times. The things that came to my mind was my concern for how well the students would be able to learn from the activities I presented to them. I realised that it’s fundamental to get their attention, to make them want to take part in the lessons, and have them leave the class feeling that they’ve both enjoyed it and achieved something.

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By Monika Salita
@monikasalita or About Monika

Do You Have What it Takes to be a TEFL Teacher?

Teaching your native language in a foreign country, sometimes located halfway around the world, to very eager and not so eager students can be an arduous task. My time teaching high school English in France was a very rewarding and key life experience for me. I loved where I lived, the new adventures I was able to experience and the work I got to do, with (mostly) eager younger learners.

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By Erin Critchley
Guest blogger from i-to-i.com

10 essential suitcase items for TEFL teachers

By User:Mattes (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

So you’re going to teach English as a foreign language are you? Heard about the wonders of getting paid to teach and travel and want to be prepared? Maybe you’re about to board a plane to TEFL town and are squeezing and squashing the last of your prized possessions into your case…

Whatever stage of the journey you’re at it’s useful to bundle together a few items that are sure to come in handy when you’re in the classroom for real.

Hold the 20th pair of socks! Here are the top ten TEFL items every teacher should pack:

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By Monika Salita
@monikasalita or About Monika

This post was inspired by Inc. Magazine’s recent article, “7 Things Highly Productive People Do.” Whether or not you agree with its points, I believe that there are some worthwhile tips mentioned, which can be easily transferred to the life of a TEFL teacher.

Some points that have helped me to effectively manage my time, and thus become a better teacher include the following:

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By Monika Salita
@monikasalita or About Monika

For many of us teachers, stepping foot on foreign soil, in a country located thousands of miles (or kilometers) away from home, possibly even on the other side of the globe, can be a shock to the senses. We must readjust ourselves – our thinking and our ways of living – in order to now be successful in our jobs. Use this shocking experience to rock the world views of your students. Show them where you come from and what makes your hometown unique, who you are, and what truly defines you.

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By Kori Czuy
An ESL Professional, with 8 years’ experience teaching, consulting and adventuring in over 50 countries worldwide

Can you spot Kori?To work overseas in general will always be a feast for the adventure appetite; a tickle in the curiosity oblongata; a point of conversation on the CV; and, as always, a healthy ripe bank of stories for the grandkids. But working in a more remote location overseas takes culture shock and adventure to another level.

With several random of-the-beaten-ESL- track jobs under my belt…. here are some ideas and advice to digest before signing that elusive rural, small village contract.

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By Grace Chinn
Grace is an EFL Teacher with 2 years’ experience teaching in Peru, Australia and Scotland.
She is currently travelling and looking for teaching work in Latin America.

Teaching English in Panama

By Mónica J. Mora (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Dubbed as one of the most developed and safest countries in all of Latin America, Panama is a great option for those who want the experience of teaching English in the Spanish speaking world, whilst never feeling too far away from modern comforts.

Within the country there are a wide range of cities and regional towns in which to search for a teaching job. City lovers will be in heaven in eclectic Panama city, a city in which old and new rub shoulders in perfect harmony. The fantastic thing about Panama City is that you are surprisingly close to the jewels of Panama- the Caribbean and Pacific Seas, both of which can be reached by car or bus in just a couple of hours.

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By Daniel Cariello
BA Hons English Literature graduate

Teaching English in Bali

By William Cho (Bali – Mt Batur Volcano Uploaded by russavia) [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Bali is a small island, (you can drive around the entire island in one day) that offers big experiences; whether you’re looking for a relaxing journey where you can enjoy the picturesque beaches and calm blue oceans, or you’re a party animal looking to jump headfirst into a labyrinth of hedonism and debauchery. Small no way means limited and Bali is becoming a prominent destination among travellers due to the magnificent scenery, the visitor-friendly atmosphere and the lively beach parties.

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By Monika Salita
@monikasalita or About Monika

Colorful comments boardLearning through playing games and other fun activities, rather than reading books and listening to lectures, is a welcome change of pace for many students.

Incorporating music into lesson plans can be a good way to learn creatively. Many types of music work well, although I caution you to think twice before teaching with rap and R’n’B music. Aside from music-related activities, many of my students enjoyed interactive games that pitted teams against one another.

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