Archive | November, 2011

By Daniel Cariello
BA Hons English Literature graduate

Teaching English in Bali

By William Cho (Bali – Mt Batur Volcano Uploaded by russavia) [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Bali is a small island, (you can drive around the entire island in one day) that offers big experiences; whether you’re looking for a relaxing journey where you can enjoy the picturesque beaches and calm blue oceans, or you’re a party animal looking to jump headfirst into a labyrinth of hedonism and debauchery. Small no way means limited and Bali is becoming a prominent destination among travellers due to the magnificent scenery, the visitor-friendly atmosphere and the lively beach parties.

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By Monika Salita
@monikasalita or About Monika

Colorful comments boardLearning through playing games and other fun activities, rather than reading books and listening to lectures, is a welcome change of pace for many students.

Incorporating music into lesson plans can be a good way to learn creatively. Many types of music work well, although I caution you to think twice before teaching with rap and R’n’B music. Aside from music-related activities, many of my students enjoyed interactive games that pitted teams against one another.

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By Daniela Pesconi-Arthur

From Brazil to the World: A Teaching Certificate is your Passport

By Tiago Fioreze (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

Being an English teacher from Brazil and having always worked there, I was happy with my English degree. But I had dreams of travelling the world. I had dreams of using the English language in other places; with different people. The ICELT (In-service Certificate in English Language Teaching)  is a certificate for those teachers who already have some experience in the classroom. It is a world recognised certificate (as is the CELTA, but the CELTA is for inexperienced teachers) and you learn loads.

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By Eduardo Santos
@eltbakery

Good professionals are aware that learning should never stop, and it’s no different for English teachers. Professional development must be seen as an ongoing process for TEFLers who are willing to be successful. With the explosion of the internet in the past decade, access to information has increased tremendously for the average individual and opened up new possibilities for free professional development online. Sharing and learning beyond the staff room is possible and it can be done anywhere at any time.

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By Daniel Cariello
BA Hons English Literature graduate

Teaching English in Berlin: Burst Through the Wall

By grafkoks2002 (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC-BY-SA-2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5-2.0-1.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Twenty years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, Berlin is regarded as one of the best European destinations in terms of culture. A relaxed and tolerant city, Berlin offers exquisite museums, theatres and opera houses to visitors. Furthermore, Berlin is one of the leading cities in the world when it comes to art, fashion, cuisine and music. A very trendy city, a TEFL Course in Berlin would be fantastic for anybody with a passion for any of these subjects.

Because of the size of the city, the demand for English-speaking language teachers is high, and accommodation can usually be found relatively cheaply. However, beware of some of the cheaper accommodation, as sometimes tourists are offered living spaces of a poor standard. Just make sure to check out the place thoroughly before signing. Obviously be sure to do any necessary visa requirements checks also.

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By Kori Czuy
An ESL Professional, with 8 years’ experience teaching, consulting and adventuring in over 50 countries worldwide

coffee ladies on the equatorIt was a humid hot March morning on the equator, and I was driving through the jungle to one of the schools where I was mentoring.  By this time, I had been working at this job for a few months, so I had already experienced many of the cultural, climactic, linguistic and social quirks of the country. On this day, however, many of them seemed to gang up on me at once and slap me in the face, to make me really realise where in the world I was.

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By Monika Salita
@monikasalita or About Monika

As a teaching assistant, you’ll find yourself ‘testing the waters’ so to speak time and time again: figuring out which lesson plans work for you and which ones don’t.

I’ll try to save you some grief by mentioning that rap songs (like Estelle and Kanye West’s “American Boy”), although hip and cool for most, aren’t the best teaching tools. I learned this through one big flop of a lesson plan.

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By Tammy Reed
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Teaching in South Africa: A Magical Linguistic Escape

By Tjeerd Wiersma from Amsterdam, The Netherlands (Camps Bay) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

This nation is a treat, not for those hungry for cash flow or any such materialistic plenitude, but for those craving experience. South Africa is a handsome, sport-loving, sociable and incredibly versatile country. The controversial historical and political past is no reflection on its warm and friendly people. It could be argued that its phenomenal climate keeps the population smiling, or maybe it’s the 3,500 kilometres of incandescent coastline.

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By Daniel Cariello
BA Hons English Literature graduate

Teaching English in Poland

By Rafal Konkolewski (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons

Poland is one of the most underrated countries in Europe, with some of the most beautiful architecture and spectacular beaches that Europe has to offer. A lot of people are unaware that the country has a coastline, but cities like Sopot offer magnificent wildly blue oceans and beaches that do not get too over-crowded. In addition, main cities such as Warsaw, Kraków and Malbork offer a fantastic range of cuisine, theatre and an impressive nightlife, where the clubs never seem to close. However, despite all this, you’ll still encounter a peasant woman selling flowers outside one of the many Gothic castles that the country has to offer. Poland is most definitely a country of contrasts that embraces new-age culture and an impressive history simultaneously.

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By Monika Salita
@monikasalita, About Monika

Too Many Teachers in the Classroom?: How to Effectively Apply Your Skills in the Classroom while Working With Another Teacher

As a native English speaker in a classroom full of students clamoring to learn the nuances of the language, teaching these students the intricate facets of formal and not so formal English should be easy. That is, unless you are working alongside a senior, non-native English speaking lead teacher who is consistently dominating lessons.

Does this lead teacher, who spends considerably more time with the students, fear your infiltration into a precisely structured lesson, throwing it off course? Perhaps. It’s up to you to prove your value in the classroom.

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