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Myanmar is an enchanting and mysterious country that has a tumultuous background. Formally known as Burma, Myanmar has been isolated from the rest of the world for the last twenty years due to inner political turmoil.

Recently Myanmar has opened it’s borders and joined ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations). They are a nation on the rise, with both domestic and foreign investors building a bigger economy.

With the rapid flood of investment and opportunity, and the fact that English is poised to be the official business language of ASEAN, the demand for English language education is extremely high in Myanmar. It’s no wonder then that Myanmar is becoming a hot new destination in the ESL teaching world.

In this article, I’ll cover just about everything you need to know about teaching in Myanmar. So let’s start with the types of jobs available.

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China visa

For years now it seems that China has long been one of the best and most popular options for teaching abroad, and it’s easy to see why; the vast landscapes, the fascinating mix of ancient cultures, the world-class cuisine, and of course, the professional opportunities.

Chinese demand for foreign teachers over the last twenty years has been massive. A 2006 article in the Economist purports that “China is already the world’s largest market for English language services.”

With many teaching positions offering over 15,000 RMB, free accommodation, airfare bonuses, and even paid vacation, it’s not hard to understand why so many young adventurers have left their western abodes to teach in Google-less and delicious China.

Yet now it seems that China is making strides to refine their selection process and tighten up the regulations on who they’re letting work in-country. Whether it’s the result of desperate employers continually hiring inexperienced professionals to meet the hungry demand, or an update to immigration policy in an increasingly bordered world, it’s impossible to say.

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What’s Granada like?

Granada is a remarkable city. It’s not particularly large (around 240,000 inhabitants) but it’s full of things to see and do. The Alhambra Palace, a Moorish citadel, is the main attraction, but part of the joy of Granada comes from simple pleasures: strolling around the winding streets with the distant sounds of flamenco guitar, meeting friends for a beer and tapas in one of the hundreds of bars scattered around the city, or just gazing at the backdrop of the wonderful Sierra Nevada mountain range.

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San Jose Costa Rica

By Carlos Adampol Galindo (Flickr: San José, Costa Rica) [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Back in naivety of my youth I dreamed of working in a paradise of golden beaches and Celeste, cloudless skies where I’d teach English to kids on the beach wearing flip flops and bermudas, then fall asleep against a coconut tree for a siesta at midday.  In reality ESL teaching is not quiet like that and working anywhere in the world is still work, however Costa Rica is a magical place to do it and the free time that one has to explore and enjoy the beauty of its treasures, makes up for the time spent in a sweaty classroom with no air conditioning. Fundamentally, it’s Costa Rica’s outstanding natural beauty that has made it one of the world’s prime eco-tourism destinations, with visitors flocking here to hike trails through ancient rain forest, climb active volcanoes or explore the high-altitude cloud forest, home to a multitude of wild and endangered animals. This country needs to be on everyone’s ‘to do’ list.

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Teaching in Saudi Arabia

When I took the CELTA and dared to dream of the many foreign lands I would travel to with my qualification, Saudi Arabia was not on the top of that list. In fact, it wasn’t even in the top ten. That was over three years ago, and still I live in this hot, sandy and conservative country. I’m sure you know about the financial benefits, but what else is there? Why did I stay?

Well, for a start; Saudi is not for everyone. I have seen handfuls of young men and women who have come here and left soon after, or been miserable because they either had misinformed expectations of Saudi Arabia, or had read ‘tax-free’ rather than ‘conservative home of Islam’.

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Teaching English in Brussels, Belgium

What brought me here?

When I started my 5 week TESOL course back in 1997 I had no idea of the journey it would enable me to take. I was certainly not aiming to be teaching in the capital of Europe several years later and at that point, nor would I have chosen to be doing so. Brussels might be the capital of the European Union and home to the European Parliament where surely English is needed but it doesn’t have a reputation for an exciting life, indeed the opposite is more likely to be heard.

Having finished my TESOL, I spent a year in Moscow learning the ropes and exploring the intricacies of the English language before leaving for Italy to spend a couple more years teaching. This experience led me to volunteer as an EFL teacher for 2 years in Rwanda before returning to Italy for a short time. All this time spent teaching motivated me to continue with my own learning curve, I completed my degree in psychology before going on to graduate with an MA in TESOL from Brighton University.

Where to go from there? With no specific plans I jumped at the chance of moving back to Europe, newly married, my husband’s offer of a job in Brussels seemed like an ideal opportunity for both of us to start work overseas, for him to embrace learning French and for me to put my knowledge of the language into practice again.

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